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R-1340 WASP ENGINE

R-1340 Wasp Engine

Pratt & Whitney's first engine was called the Wasp.

Completed on Christmas Eve of 1925, the Wasp was an air-cooled, radial piston engine with 1,340 cubic inches of displacement. It also featured a revolutionary design for the crankshaft and master rod, which eliminated what had proved to be a weak area in other engines. The new Wasp weighed less than 650 pounds.

The Wasp developed 425 horsepower on its third test run. It easily passed Navy qualification testing in March 1926, and by October of the same year, the Navy had ordered 200 engines. The Wasp demonstrated exceptional capabilities. It exhibited speed, rate of climb, performance at altitude and reliability that revolutionized American aviation, shattering one record after another. Soon it dominated Navy and Army Air Force fighter planes.

The Wasp also made its mark on early commercial aviation during the 1930s. Charles Lindbergh shattered the transcontinental speed record in 1930 with his Wasp-powered Lockheed Sirius. Jimmy Doolittle relied on his Wasp to take his Gee Bee aircraft to new speeds. And, Amelia Earhart made history with her Wasp-powered Lockheed Electra 10E.

Airplane designers, targeting the expanding market for future commercial transports, shaped their designs around the Wasp. One plane to switch from liquid- to air-cooled propulsion was the Ford Tri-motor, known as the "Tin Goose" Wasp engines powered approximately 100 different experimental airplanes. It remained in production until 1960, with later models producing up to 600 horsepower. Almost 35,000 engines were manufactured.

Specs

  • Displacement:
    1,340 cubic inches
  • Revolutions per minute: 1,900-2,250
  • Weight: 650-938 pounds
  • First run: 1925
  • First flight: 1926
  • Production years: 1925-1960
  • Engines produced: 34,966

Airplanes Powered

  • Amphibions N-2-C
  • Atlantic C-5
  • Bell H-12
  • Bellanca L-11
  • Bellanca AT-15BL
  • Bellanca JE-1
  • Boeing At-15BO
  • Boeing P-26
  • Boeing P-29
  • Boeing C-73
  • Boeing F2B
  • Boeing F3B
  • Boeing F4B
  • Boeing Model 40 A
  • Boeing Model 100 SP
  • Boeing Model 204
  • Buhl CA-6W
  • Canadian Car & Foundry C-64
  • Cessna C-106A
  • Chase XPG-4
  • Commonwealth of Australia Whiraway
  • Curtiss Wright XA-4
  • Curtiss Wright XO-12
  • Curtiss Wright P-3A
  • Curtiss Wright O-52
  • Curtiss Wright SOC
  • Curtiss Wright A6A
  • Curtiss Wright Model 6000A
  • Detroit C-23
  • Detroit C-25
  • DeHavilland DHC-3
  • Douglas C-29
  • Douglas Model EJ-2
  • Douglas Model 25-2
  • Douglas BT-2
  • Douglas C-29
  • Douglas O-32
  • Eastern RD-1, 2, 3, 4
  • Fairchild F-1 Model 71
  • Fairchild FB-3
  • Fairchild C-96 Model 71
  • Fairchild AT-13 Yankee Doodle
  • Fairchild FC-2W
  • Fiat G-49
  • Fokker F-10A
  • Fokker F-22
  • Fokker S-13
  • Fokker Super Universal
  • Ford C-4
  • Ford 5AT
  • Frye F-1
  • Goodyear K & M Ships
  • Grumman G-73
  • Hamiliton H-45
  • Junkers JU-52
  • Kaman HOK-1, 2
  • Laird LC-RW-450
  • Lockheed C-12 Vega
  • Lockheed C-17 Vega
  • Lockheed 10, UC-36B
  • Lockheed UC-85
  • Lockheed C-101
  • Lockheed Altair
  • Lockheed Air Express 3
  • Lockeed Executive
  • Macchi MB-323
  • McDonnell AT-15MC
  • N.A.F. SON-1
  • Noorduyn AT-6
  • Noorduyn C-64
  • North American AT-6 (SNJ)
  • North American BC-1, 2
  • North American Y1BT-10
  • North American NJ-1
  • North American NA-16
  • Northrop A-17AS
  • Northrop C-19
  • Northrop Pioneer
  • Northrop Delta
  • Piaggoio P-150
  • Piasecki HRP-1, 2
  • Ryan B-7
  • Sikorsky C-6
  • Sikorsky S-38
  • Sikorsky S-55 (HO4S)
  • Stearman Model 4E
  • Stearman Alpha 4A
  • Stearman YOSS-1
  • Stinson SM-6B
  • Thomas Morse XP-13A
  • Thomas Morse O-19
  • Thomas Morse O-22
  • Vought OSU-1
  • Vought XF2U-1
  • Vought O2U
  • Vought O3U
  • Vultee YBC-3
  • Zenith Z-6-A